The consequences of Israel’s territorial gains from the Six Day War for peace with Egypt

My essay is finished. The link is here:

My contention is that the formerly Egyptian territory Israel gained in the Six Day War was the key motivation in Egypt’s signing of the Camp David Accord with Israel, the hardest negotiated concession Israel made and as such, was the principal factor for peace between the two countries. This essay seeks to understand the role Israel’s territorial gains of the Sinai Peninsula and the waterways around it played in securing its peace with Egypt. It will examine Israeli and Egyptian leadership, their decisions, the external influences on their decisions, and the importance of territory in peace negotiations and the Camp David Accord between Israel and Egypt. It will focus on the time between the end of the war and the signing of peace treaties, and does not consider ancient Arab and Jewish territorial claims.

I would love to hear feedback, either here or at Scribd.

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3 Responses to “The consequences of Israel’s territorial gains from the Six Day War for peace with Egypt”

  1. James Says:

    Very nice essay. However land for peace will not work when it comes to the Palestinian issue. The palis regard all of Israel as “occupied land” .

  2. menso Says:

    That sounds like a pretty big generalisation. My research indicates that most Palestinians, including Hamas, would be happy if Israel withdrew to the Green Line. Israel, however, is unwilling to give up the occupation of the West Bank and the blockade of Gaza.

  3. JR Says:

    And what happened when Israel gave up Gaza? Rockets were raining down on Israeli towns.
    BTW, prior to 1967 the West Bank was occupied by the Jordanians. And before the Jordanians it was occupied by the British…and before the British it was occupied by the Ottoman Empire….
    Most Israelis would be happy to go back to 1967 borders if they can live in real peace.


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